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FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Vol. 34 June 14, 1937 No. 24 



LATE CABLES. 



Bulgaria 1937 winter grain production offi- 
cially estimated as follows, with 1936 comparisons in 
parentheses: Wheat 64,007,000 bushels (55,775,000), 
rye 9,133,000 (8,668,000), barley 14,008,000 bushels 
(12,300,000). (International Institute of Agricul- 
ture, Rome.) 

Morocco acreage and production of grains in 
1937 reported as follows, with 1936 figures . in pa- 
rentheses: Wheat 2,743,000 acres (3,194,000), 
17,637,000 bushels (13,242,000): barley, 4,201,000 
acres (4,104,000), 34,447,000 bushels (70,108,000); 
oats, 94,000 acres (80,000), 2,756,000 bushels 
(1,328,000). (International Institute of Agricul- 
ture, Rome,) 

Czechoslovakia area sovm for 1937 harvest esti- 
mated as follows, with 1936 sowings in parentheses: 
Potatoes 1,912,000 acres (1,876,000), sugar beets 
415,000 acres (381,000), (International Institute of 
Agriculture. Rome.) 

Sydney, Australia, wool sales closed June 10. 
Prices for inferior fleece and low skirtings were 5 
percent lower than at opening of series on June 7, 
others unchanged. (Agricultural Attache, C. C. 
Taylor, London. ) 



318 



Porcign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 



GEAIUS 

Canadian ctot;:- prospects decline 

According to a cable from the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, the 
condition figures for all field crops as of May 31, 1937, were "belov? 
average and, with the exception of winter wheat, peas, and mixed grains, 
"below the condition at the same time last year. Manitoba is the only 
one of the v/estern provinces in which prospects for all crops continue 
good. The situation in southwestern Alberta continues favorable and in 
northern and northeastern Saskatchewan crops are holding up v/ell, al- 
though rain would be welcome. In central Alberta and throughout much 
of the southern half of Saskatchewan, serious and widespread wind dam- 
age has occurred. Further serious deterioration of crops in these areas 
can be averted only through the timuly arrival of adequate rains. 

PEJITS, VEGETABIJiS, AND NUTS 

L arge European fruit crop in prospect 

Preliminary indications point to an abundant crop of fruit in 
Europe this season, _^according to a report prepared by C. C. Taylor, 
Agricultural Attache at London. There was little winter injury to 
orchards and blossoming was generally abundant. Excessive rains caused 
poor pollination in some countries but only the plum and prune crops in 
Yugoslavia were seriously damaged. In England and France, where large 
apple crops were harvested in 1936, production may be lower, but large 
fruit crops are expected in Germany and the Netherlands following the 
small crops last year. 

Since European countries form the chief outlet for exports of 
United States apples and pears, a large crop may have a depressing ef- 
fect on the exports of these fruits from the United States during the 
1937-38 export sea.son, July to June, particularly since present indica- 
tions point to large apple and pear crops in the United States. Com- 
petition from European npples occurs chiefly during the 3-month period, 
October to Eecembcr, but in recent years there has been a definite trend 
toward the use of cold storage as a means of prolonging the season for 
EurOT)ean apples and pears. 

Small production of citrus oils in Sicily 

As a result of a small citrus crop, the production of essential 
oils from citrus fnaits in Sicily was small during the 1936-37 season, 
according to a report received from rilliani E. Scotten, American Vice 
Consul at Palermo. The production of lemon oil is estimated at approxi- 
mately 928,000 pounds, or about half the quantity produced in 1935-36. 
The production of sweet orange oil is said to have been around 71,000 



June 14, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



319 



pounds, or about 15 percent less than in 1935-36. Production of lemon 
juice also was small in 1936-37. Exports of essential oils vrero much 
heavier than in 1935-35 "but v/ero s.lightly "below the exports of 1934-35. 
Prices during the season wore untxs:ftally high, reaching a peak in March. 

Exports of orange oil from Erench Guinea increasin g 

Exports of orange oil from French Guinea during the 9-month 
period, July to March, amounted to 414,237 pounds compared with 279,668 
pounds in the same months of 1935-36, according to a communication from 
the Paris offic'e 'of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The heavy 
increase in exports resulted from a sharp increase in prices of from 17,50 
francs per kilogram in September to 50,50 francs in March. These prices 
are equal to 52 cents and $1.05 per pound, respectively. 

Cuba increasing pineapple production 

The area planted to pineapple's in Cuba is unofficially estimated 
at from 6,700 to 8,500 acres and the production this year is expected 
to be between 1,575,000 and 1,775,000 crates, as reported' by Consul 
Harold S.. Towell- at Habana. The chief kinds of pineapples grown are 
the Spanish Red (Pina Morada) and the Sugar Loaf or Cuban White (Pina 
Blanca). The former is the variety that is shipped fresh to the United ' 
States and Canada,. Because of the high sugar content and fine flavor ,' 
of the Sugar Loaf pineapple, it is preferred to the Spanish Red variety 
for local consumption. It is, however, unsuitable for canning and i"s 
generally considered too tender for export,, though small, quantities are 
exported. Experimental plantings of the smooth Cayenne variety, v/hicH 
is the important commercial ccmhing variety uf Hawaii, have been suc- 
cessful. Pineapples are grown commercially in all Provinces of C"aba 
except Santa Clara, and production is heaviest in the Provinces of 'Pinar 
del Rio, Habana, and Matanzas. 

From 5,500 to 6,500 acres are planted to Spanish Red and between 
1,200 and 2,000 acres to Sugar Loaf pineapples, according to trade esti- 
mates. Production is expected to be around 900,000. tP. 1, 400,000 crates 
of Spanish Rod and 375,000 crates' of • Sugar' Loaf pineapples. Tho crates 
contain, on an average, from 24- to ■ 30 pineapples and weigh around 70 
pounds. The number packed to a crate varies from, 12 to 42 fruits. No 
estimate was made of the production 'of 'smooth Cayenne ,but -30 acres are 
planted to this variety in Matanzas Province. 

Pineapples are exported from' Cuba the year around,, but the bulk 
of the movement occurs in the 3-month period, April to June.- Exports 
of pineapples to the United States ih' 1937 are expected to bo around 
1,000,000 crates compared with , 858, 043 ■ crates' in 1936/ Around 115 cars 
of bull^ pineapples are stated to -have -been ■ shipped to canneries in 
Canada in 1935 and about the same quantity is expected to go forward in 



320 



!Forel.gn Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, lo. 24 



1937. Bulk shipments amounting to alDout 35 carloads (15,000 crates) are 
expected to go to a Florida cannery during the present season* The quan- 
tity exported in 1937 will depend materially upon rainfall during June, for 
heavy rains cause pineapples to deteriorate rapidly. 

The yield of Spanish Red pineapple varies according to the sev- 
eral factors that affect growth, such as the quality of the soil, amount 
of fertilizer used, rainfall and use of irrigation, and the age of the 
plants* Pineapple plants in CulDa bear four crops, although many growers 
are understood to be reluctant to continue to cultivate plants that have 
borne three crops as the fourth yield is relatively small and costly. 
As the result of a study of four pineapple farms, the Cuban Department 
of Agriculture has determined the following average production of pine- 
apples from the various crops: First crop, 281 crates (24 to crate) of 
pineapples per acre; second crop, 289 crates per acre; third crop, 191 
crates per acre; and fourth crop, 63 crates per acre, making an average 
for the four crops of 206 crates per acre* These yields are, however, 
substantia_lly greater than shown by other studies; consequently they 
cannot be assumed to represent an average for the country as a whole. 
One study indicated yields as low as 63 and another 120 crates per acre. 

Pineapples bear the first crop, known locally as "corona planta", 
about 18 months after slips are set out, and it is customary to apportion 
to that crop the entire cost of preparing the land, the cost of plants 
and fertilizer, as well as land rent for 2 years, since the space de- 
voted to new plants is unproductive the first year. The second crop, 
or "corona soca", is the cheapest crop to produce, as the cost is limited 
to land rent and cultivation. The third crop, or "resoca,", is stated 
to be relatively more costly to produce than the previous crop, as the 
yield and size of fruit are smaller and the extensive use of fertilizer 
is necessary. 

The average cost of growing a crate of pineapples has been esti- 
mated by the Cuban Department of Agriculture as follows: 



Land rent $0.0337 

Prepara.tion of soil 0081 

Pineapple slips 0256 

Preparing furrows. 0024 

Planting ' . 004-9 

Replanting 0049 

Fertilizing 0248 

Cultivation 0718 

Growing .0363 

Total '$0.2125 

Packing 0.2620 

Total cost for shipment $0.4745 



June 14, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



321 



LIVESTOCK, m;;-:a.tc, ii-td ^tool 

Snialler European ho-- niam'ber s in prospect 

A decline in European hog nuin'oers is in progress, and a reduced 
slaughter in 1938 is' protahle, according to census figures furnished 
loy K. E. Reed, Livestock Specialist at Jerlin, Kiambers of "brood sows 
in 9 producing countries in late 1935 and early 1937 wore all smaller 
than comparahle figures for a yea.r earlier. Figures covering total hog 
nujnhers in 15 countries and referring to the last half of 1935 an.d early 
1937 in most cases were considerahly lo.'--ger than the previous year' s 
figures. (See table on page 334.) The high costs developed in certain 
countries during 1935, however, have resulted in heavy liquidations of 
"breeding and slaughter hogs. In most of the 11 European countries for 
which slauglriter figures are availa"b]-£, 'the increases in the 1935 slaughter 
over 1935 were continued into 1937. (Sg ta"'ole on page 335.) Indications 
now point to a slaughter for the firs t h:.Jf of 1937 somewhat larger than 
in the compara"ble 1935 period, with reductions below 1936 figures develop- 
ing later in 1937. 

Tiie increased slaughter of late 1935 and early 1937 has, of 
course, greatly increased domestic supplies of pork and made conti- 
nental Europe less dependent on tTestern Hemisphere sources. The in- 
crease in domestic slaughter, however, has "by no means supplied suffi- 
cient lard to replace former shipments frc:n the United States, and lard 
consumption has declined. In countries which have "been a"ble to ohtain 
raw materials for margarine production, consumption or margarine and 
artificial fats has increased. The prospective decline in European hog 
production, the rather general shift from fat- to meat-type hogs, and the 
reduction whichhas taken place in world stocks of oilseeds and #iale oil 
indicates that in 1938 Europe may have need for increased supplies of 
Western Hemisphere lard. 

A ustralia repor ts lower wool prices 

At the opening on June 7 of tne current series of wool sales at 
Sydney, Australia, prices were somewhat lower than at the closing of 
the preceding series on April 22, accordi^^g to cahled advices.'f rom 
Agricultural Attache C. C. Taylor at London. Fairly keen competition' 
was reported for a miscellaneous selection of offerings, "but best 
descriptions sold off 5 percent from April closing rates. Other 
descriptions were 7.5 to 10 percent under the earlier figures. The 
easier tone at Sydney follows reports of reduced "buying activity in 
the British wool trade at Bradford. The British industry, however, 
has confidence in the position of raw ir.aterials, according to Consul 



322 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Yol. 34, No, 24 



E. E. Evans at Bradford, and no material fall in values is anticipated 
despite the fact that for a number of weeks there has "been a scarcity 
of bulk business. ■■: : 

Bradford transactions in tops of either merino or crossbred 
qualities were confined to relatively small- lots late in May, Mr. Evans 
reports. Users appeared to prefer to keep out of the market so as to 
obtain full benefit of any easier price tendencies. Some top makers 
were meeting buyers' prices to keap their plants going, but most firms 
were not pressing for new business. The industry, however, continued 
well occupied, and an accumulation of delayed buying orders for tops 
was anticipated for the near future. In the piece-goods trade, arders 
have been fairly heavy for autumn and wint-er cloth.. According to cloth 
exporters, trade is improving with the United States, Canada, South , 
Africa, and the Scandinavian countries. 



RAPID INCREASE IN C-SRIvl4N SILO CONSTRUCTION ■ - 

A recent census indica.ted the existence of 238,587 silos in 
Germany used for the storage of green fodder and potatoes. The total 
capacity of those in existence at the beginning of 1937 amounted to 
188,000,000 cubic feet. , 

More than a third of the silos now in existence were constructed 
in 1936. Prior to 1931 there were 18,821 silos in Germany. Construc- 
tion of new silos since that date is shown in the following tabulation: 

Year of c onstruction Number of silos built 

3,821 
7,771 
20,883 
34,170 
67,647 
85,677 

Appro xim^at el y 90 percent of the silos are constructed of con- 
crete or bricks, .about 5 percent of sheet iron or steel, and the 
remaining 5 percent of lumber. 

In addition to the above silos, a large number of pit silos are 
used in Germany, principally for the storage of potatoes for livestock 
feed. The potatoes are first cooked and ferment readily after being 
placed in the pits. 



1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 



June 14, 1937 



"Foveiga Crops and Markets 



323 



imiTED STATES AC-RICULTUBAL EXPORTS DURING APRIL 

Expressed as an index numter, United States exports of farm, 
products for the month of April 1937 stood at 55, a gain over April of 
the 2 years immediately preceding although somewhat less than the ex- 
ports for March. 

Cotton with an index of 79 held up fairly well, reaching the 
highest point sicne Octooer 1936 and exceeding that for April of the 
past 2 years. 

Exports of tohacco with an index of 76 took a downward turn, 
reaching the lowest, point since July 1936, and one of the lowest 
April indexes of the post-war period. 

After the sharp decline in March, exports of fruits were sud- 
stantially higher, the index ainounting to 200 which was "below most of 
the April indexes of other recent years. 

The index for wheat and flour, which stood at 23, duplicated 
that of the 2 preceding months and v;as the highest April index since 
1934. 

Though showing some improvement over- the 4 preceding months, the 
increases in cured pork and lard were not large, the indexes standing 
at 14 and 22, respectively. 



UNITED STATES: Index numbers of the volume of agricultural exports, 
adjusted for seasonal variation, April 1937, with comparisons 

(July 1909 - June 1914 = 100) 



Commodity or commodity group • 


1935 


1936 


1937 


Apr. 


Apr . 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 




48 


54 


52 


57 


55 


All commodities, except cotton..: 


32 


36 


42 


36 


36 


Cotton fiber, including linters.: 


67 


71 


73 


77 


79 




57 


77 


85 


88 


76 




217 


300 


274 


177 


200 




18 


20 


23 


23 


23 




18 


16 


23 


21 


20 




18 


11 


9 


11 


14 




19 


• 25 


10 


16 


22 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 

Commerce. For detailed figures on exports, see page 

a/ Includes stems, trimmings, etc. 

b/ Includes bacon, hams, shoulders, and sides. 



324 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 24 



UNITED STATES AGRICULTURAIj EXPORTS DURING APRIL, CONT'D 

Ac c'cuml at i o n s - July-April 

United States exports of farm products in the 10 months ended 
April 30, 1937, were valued at $646,056,000 as against $681,808,000 in 
the saTie period last season, a decrease of 5 percent. Volume exports 
for the same period fell from an index of 61 in 1935-36 to 56 in 1936-37, 
a decline of 8 percent. 

E2cports of cotton fell telow those of 1935-36, the total for the 
10 months ended April 30 amounted to 5,147,000 hales with a value of 
$334,297,000 as compared with 5,716,000 hales valued at $350,559,000 for 
the same period a year ago. This represents a decrease of 10 percent in 
volume but, "because of higher prices, the decline in value was less than 
5 percent. Exports to Japan held up hotter than to most other countries, 
amounting to 1,426,000 hales and accounting for 28 percent of the total 
exports. This was only 8,000 hales less than the amount purchased hy 
Japan in the same period the preceding year. 

The downward trend in ei^orts of leaf tobacco, which has prevailed 
during most of the present season, continued through April; the total 
for the 10 months ended April 30 amounted to 344,133,000 pounds as 
against 380,780,000 pounds for the corresponding period a year earlier. 
Smaller purchases of flue-cured leaf on the part of the United Kingdom 
account for most of the decrease. The only types recording a gain over 
1935-35 were hurley, dark Virginia, green river, and peri que, the com- 
bined exports of which were insignificant in comparison with the total 
leaf exported. 

Because of the effects of last season's drought in this country 
and at least an average European prodaction, exports of fruit with the 
exception of fresh pears, dried apricots, and raisins were under those 
of a year ago . 

In the 10-month period, the United States exported 17,263,000 
bushels of wheat including flour, a gain of 33 percent over the unusually 
small exports a year earlier, when they stood at 13,012,000 bushels. 
Flour milled from imported grain ma.de up nearly three-fifths of these 
export s. 

Meat made a better showing than last season, the total increasing 
from 82,814,000 pounds in the July- April period of 1935-36 to 89,220,000 
pounds so far this season. Gains in exports of fresh pork, bacon, canned 
and pickled meats more than offset the decline in exports of fresh beef, 
hams, and shoulders. Exports of lard regained a portion of the ground 
lost last season, the total amounting to 79,612,000 pounds. In 1935-36, 
exports amounted to 55,933,000 pounds. 



1 



^une 14, 1937 



J'Oi^eigD.. Crops aid Markets 



325 



UNITED STATES: 



Esqoorts of principal a^ricult-ural products, 
JtOy^A pril, 1935^36 and 1936^ ;?7 



Commodity e^iportsd 



: Unif 



ANIUALS ML AHim PHOrUCTS; : ■ 

Animals, live ; • 

Cattle ; No. 

Hogs' : No. 

Horses | No . 

Mules, asses, and "burros \ No. 

Dairy prodacts ; : 

Butter : Lb. 

Cheese , . ; L"b. 

Milk- i 

• Fresh, and sterilised ; Gal. 

Condensed \ Lh. 

Dried • : Lb. 

Evaporated- ; Lb. 

Infants' foods, malted, etc. . ; Lb. 

Eggs, in the shell ; Doz. 

Meats and meat prodacts ; ; 

Beef and veal- ' ■ 

Eresh or frozen : Lb. 

pickled or cared " Lb. 

Canned beef, incl. corned .. • Lb. 

Total 'be^f and veal : Lb. 

. Pork- . : 

Carcasses, fresh ■ Lb. 

Lpins and other fresh • Lb. 

.Total fresh pork . • Lb. 

Bacon • Lb. 

Hams and shoulders '. . . ; Lb. 

Sides, Camber. & Wiltshire . '. Lb. 

pickled or salted .. ; Lb. 

Canned ; Lb. 

Total po'rk : Lb. 

Mutton and lamb : Lb. 

Poultry and game, fresh : Lb. 

Sausage- ; 

Canned : Lb. 

Other sausage : Lb. 

Other meats- : 

Eresh, frozen, or cured .... • Lb. 
Canned, incl. canned 

poultry ; Lb . 

Total meat s : Lb . 

Meat extracts and bouillon ; 

cubes .Lb. 

Seusage casings ' Lb. 



Ouantity _ , . 




1935-36 . 


1936-37 *. 


1935^36 ; 


1936^37 






1,000 : 


1,000 


Thousands: 


Thousands; 


dollars : 


dollars 


3 : 


IT., ■ ■ ,1 ■ ■ - , 

4 ; 


282 : 


306 


a/ : 


a/ i 


• 7 : 


8 


4 : 


3 i 


■ 714 i 


• 535 


2 ' 


1 ' 


• ■ 462 \ 


172 


O 1 o 




' 227 


245 


QQQ 


sou 


?n4 . 


228 


... ■ - 

70 


, , . 55 




A7 


2,761 


1,545 


333 


180 


2, 597 


3,087 


DO ( 


DUX 


21,641. 


18 ,866 


1,474 


T A r\7 
1 ,4U 1 


1 , 718 


2,428, 


c o c 

o3p. 




«7 f 

l,o85 


1 , 554 


A PJf 


4.6P 


3,972 


3, o4u 


\ Dyx 


\J J X. 


4,484 


7,081 






1, 376 


2, 34o 




714 

. • X" 


9, 332 


T m n/;7' 


. X ^ ODD 


1 899 


87 


147 


; 13 


: 20 






: - 503 


: fe42 


2.978 


; 3.337 


:■ 516 


: 662_ 


3,012 


' 3,312 


: • 587 


584 


36,310 


• 32,087 


:■ 7,457' 


; 6,745 


415 


: 302 


: 76 


; 46 


5,182 


: 7 ^ood 




; 355 


6. 369 


; 6,914 






54,266 


; 53,504 


: 11 , 667 ■ 


: 11,123 


/I Al 




: 82 


: 82 


1 , 321 


: 1,179 


: 322 


\ 265 


901 


: 1,335 


; 240 


I 36i 


1 , 014 


i 993 


: 236 


: 211 


13,967 


: 16,522^ 




: . 2,130 


1.070 


: 2.160 


: 259 


: . 332 


• 82.814 


: 89 . 220 


: 16,218- 


: 16.403 


■95- 


- 65 


j 141 


: 119 


21,732 


\' 2l , 2$4 


: 4,669 


! 4,443 



Continued -* 



326 



Joreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, ¥.0. 24 



UNITED STATES: 



Exports of principal, agrioultiiral products, 
July-i^rii. 1935-36 and 1936-37, cont^d , 



Commodity exported 



Unit 



AMLiALS AKD MIIUL PRODUCTS , COH!D ' $ 
Oils and fats> anim&l ; : 

Lard ■ ; Lb. 

Lard, neutral : Lb. 

Oleo Oil* : Lb. 

Oleo stock ; Lb. 

Stearins and fatty acids Lb, 

Tallow......... Lb. 

Other anirae.l oils and fats ; Lb. 

Total oils and fats Lb. 

VEGETABLE PHODUGTS: I 
C otton, ungfd . (Bales of 500 lb.)i 

Haw, except lifiters Bale 

Linters , '; Ba,le 

Fr uits ; . ■ : • 

Apples- \ 

Fresh, : Bskt 

Fresh : Box 

Fresh '. Bbl, 

Dried .\ ; Lb. 

Ap^.-'icots, dried ; Lb. 

Grapefruit • Box 

Oranges » : Box 

Pears, fresh i Lb. 

Prures, dried.... ; Lb. 

Raisins, • Lb. 

Fruit* caoned, | Lb. 

Pecans .: Lb. 

Walnut s. : Lb . 

grain a . flour ; and meal ; • 

Barley, excluding flour(4e lb.)) Bu. 

Buckwheat, excluding flour (48 Ib^; Bu. 

Corn, including Gornmeal(56 lb.) ; Bu. 

. Malt (34 lb.).,. I Bu. 

' XIats, including oatmeal (32 lb.) : Bu. 
^Rice, including flour, meal : 

and broken rice b/ I Lb. 

P^e, excluding flour (56 lb.) • Bu. 

TJTheats grain (§0 lb.) : Bu. 

Wheat flour- *, 

Wholly of U.S. wheat | Bbl. 

Other wheat flour | Bbl. 

Total wheat flour • Bbl. 

Wkeat, including flour' * Bu. 



_Jul y-Aprl l 



Q:iian tity 



Value 



1935-36 



ThousaJxd.s 



56,933 
529 
7,213 
2,538 
2,307 
1,677 



93.868 



5,716 
254 



1,070 
6,353 
1,463 
30,933 
25 , 715 
773 
4,335 
123,832 
199,013 
100,973 
313,841 

672 
11,649 

8,394 
a,/ 
488 
18 
916 

83 , 654 
6 

251 

686 
2,02 9 



2,715 



13,012 



1936-37 



Thousa nds 



79,612 
649 
5,846 
2,741 
1,939 
1,075 



5,147 

287 



205 
5,065 
445 
20.341 
27,762 
595 
2,549 
130,852 
145 , 811 
102,382 
245 , 043 

1,725 
12,035 

5,003 
1 

489 
74 
742 

41,415 
6 

2,003 

1,040 
2,2Q7 



17,263 



1935-36 



1,000 
dollars 
• a. 773 
75 
888 
290 
191 
146 



,11,375. 



350,659 
6,117 



2.139 
9,298- 
6,143 
2,584 
3,581 
1,707 

10,755 
4,785 
8,749 
4,782 

22,756 

182 
1,160 

4,523 

a/ 
593 
25 
1,037 

2,584 

6 

256 



3,196 



12,717 



12,973 



1936-37 



1,000 
dollars 



,895 
87 
608 
276 
158 
77 
■523 



21^- 



334,297 
7,020 



390 
7,922 
1,858 
1,910 
3,468 
1,278 
7,913 
4,855 
7,730 
5,535 
18,231 

330 
1,202 

3,905 

1 

609 
130 
1,236 

1,335- 
5 

2,034r 

.'5,188 
11 , 933 - 



3 7,1. 



19,15£ 



June Ik, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



327 



UNITED STATES: Exports of principal agricultural products, 

July-April, 1935-35 and 1936-37, cont»d 









July-April 




Commodity exported 


Unit 


Quantity 


Value 






■ 1935-36 


1936-37 


1935-36 


19 36-37 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS GOKTIKUED • 








X , UwU 


X , uuu 






xnousancLs 


iuousancLs 


aoxxars 


cLoxxars 




L* ton 


q 


A 
rr 


PAT 


XOt: 


Linseed cake and meal ...•••<• 


L» t on 


XO<o 


XOC 


, xy± 




Cottonseed oil crude • • • 


Lb. 


• OKJ D 


1 RQ 


pp 


PI 


Cottonseed oil refined • 


Lb. 




0 , icox 


oxx 


PR1 


Sugar (2,000 l"bs.) 


Ton 




Do 


QPQ 


<C/ , Do ( 


Tobacco leaf ! 












Bris'h.t flue— cured 


Lb . 


CiUT} , CXO 


0 r , uoX 


T PD 1 '^Q 
XoW , xo^ 


XWD , ^7 X>7 




Lb . 




R AQQ 




X , DX 


Dark— fired TCv. & TennBc;«^ep ... 


Lb. 


46 , 401 


35,044 


5, 459 


4, od4- 




Lb. 


0 0 / n 
0 , o4tU 


D , ybx 


cJ , XXo 






T 1-1 


4,999 


4 648 


1, 033 


872 




T.'h 


? 30 


? 69? 


353 


508 




Lb. . 


1 104 


565 


99 


59 




Lb. 


647 


439 


357 


271 


Black fat, water baler and 














Lb. 




8 ,418 


1, 520 


1, 537 




Lb. 


T OR 


146 


39 


. 49 




Lb. 


380 780 


344 133 


132 617 


118 , 824 


Tobacco ^tem=! trimmi'np's snd 














Lb. ' 


Xo , ^ 0 D 


1 Q Al S 


341 


AT 7 

vj X f 


Vegetable ^: 


















"7 pm 




1 fi7 

Xw r 


*P p rj G HviPr^ 


T.'h 

JjU • 


2 , 847 


7 , 711 






Otit n n Q . * . . 


iJ u . 






Duo 






Lb . 


96 ,068 


52, 572 


1, 079 


T Tor? 

1, 183 




T.'h 
JjU • 


29 , 286 


31,285 


2,881 


3,079 


Misc. vegetable products: 












Drugs, herbs, roots, etc 


Lb. 


4,073 


4,185 


1,072 


1.720 




Lb. 


28,016 


20,739 


737 


664 




Lb. 


•6,225 


3,664 


889 


1,085 




Lb. 


44,006 


27 , 648 


1,357 


1,008 


TOTAL PSIKCrPAL AGRICULTURAL 




















645,498 


505,798 


TOTAL AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 








681,808 


646,056 


TOTAL EXPORTS, ALL CCMMODITIES. . 








L, 997, 010 


2,248,900 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Less than 500. 

b/' Includes paddy in terms of cleaned. , 



328 



To reign Crops ani Markets 



vol. 34, Ko. 24 



UlTITED states: Imports (for consumption) of Principal agricultural 

products, July-April, 193^36 and 1936-37 ^ 

July- April 



Commodity imported : Unit 

COI'a PETITIV E \ " 

AIJIMALS AUniAL PRODUCTS: j 

Animals, live : \ 

Cattle- ; 
Dutiable (by weight)- ; 
Less than 700 lb. each... '.No. 
700 pounds or more, each. : No. 
Total cattle (dutiable) : No. 

Free (for breeding) j No. 

Hogs (except for breeding) . . • : Lb. 

Horses ; 

Dairy products : • 

Butter : ^"^^ 

Casein i 

Cheese- • 

Swiss i 

Cheddar : 

Other cheese 1 ti^* 

Total cheese : Lb. 

Cream : (xbI- 

Milk- *: 
Condensed and evaporated... : Lb. 

Dried and malted j 

Whole, sic. and buttermilk.. ; G-al. 
Eggs and ogg product s: ! 

Iggs, in the shell..... '. Doz. 

I^g albramen, dried {"^y* 

YoUcs, dried. • 

Other egg products. . , • • • L'o* 

Hides and skins. • ♦ • 

Meats and meat produ cts; J 
Beef and veal- : 

Presh l'^}' 

Pickled or cured j Lb. 

Canned, incl. corned : Lb. 

Mutton and lamb, fresh : Lb. 

Pork- i 

Fresh ; 

Hams, shoulders and bacon.. ; Lb. 
Pickled, salted and other.. ; Lb. 

Poultry and gatae : Lb. 

Other meats- '. 

Fresh : 

Canned, pi-epared or pres. '; Lb. 

Total meats • ho. 

Sa"u.sage casings -Lb. 

Tallow : 

Wool, unmfd. , ex. free in bond. : Lb. 



Value 



>9;,u.a.ii"-^ -J ; 

1935-36 . 1936-37 ; . 


iJd OO—OO ; 


1 9,^^6-37 ill 


housands : 


Thousand^ 


dollars | 


1,000 . 1 
do liars 1 


dciL ; 

98 : 


204 ■ 

113 : 


3,341 : 
4,412 i 


2,754 1 
5,858 ^ 


319 : 


317 : 


7,753 i 


8 , 612 


9 : 
8 , 560 ; 
.14 : 


10 : 

16 , 714 i 

13 : 


800 i 

765 ; 

1,735,; 


9 63 
1,397 
1 820 


5,463 : 
8,729 '; 


14 , 164 ; 

10 , 663 '; 


1,035 : 
686 : 


3,061 
1,045 


: 5,084 .1 
; a/3,217 .: 
: ,83. 671 • 


8.575: 1,402: 
8,810 :a/ 409 : 
m.'Ui?.^/ 7,849. 


2,320 
1,310 
8,112 


■ 41.972 


56.927 ; 


9,660 


11,742 


; 4 


59 ; 


5 : 


89 


: 838 • 
; 8,314 
: 31 


i, yol ; 
12,559 ; 
44 : 


34 
443 
7 


90 
636 

■ 10 


: 265 
i 1,679 
; 3,45? 
i 959 

: c/ 


i 513 ; 
i 2,450: 
: 4,496: 
: 1,950 : 
: c/ : 


46 
741 
521 
176 
45,270 


: 85 
1 931 
i 6 63 
i 326 
: 53,188- 


• 5, 55L) 
; 1,334 
' 7? "^04 

: 39 


< « 

i 2,988 : 
j 1,534: 
: 59 , 634 ■ 

: 120 


373 

95 
6,330 
5 


j 259 
; 129 
5 , 694 

'; 


: 5,895 
: 9,907 
: 1,765 
: 678 


i 14,417 
31,395 
'; 2 , 834 
■; 1,327 


: 866 
; 2 , 479 
i 479 
: 241 


: 8 , 478 
; 707 
: 380 


; 771 

: 354 


: 455 
: 143 


94 
63 


; 86 
: 43__ 


: 98.797 


: 114.947 


: 11.025 


i 17,74]^ 


: 10 , 454 
: 126 , 328 
: 83,753 


: 14,703 
: 49,994 
: 154 , 310 


i 5,316 
: 7,347 
• 18,571 


; 7,983 
: 2,471 

. : 45,280 



June 14, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



329 



UNITED STATES: Imports (fo 
products, July' 



r conRumption) of principal agricultural 
■-April, 1935-35 and 1936-37, cont'd 



Commodity imported 



CCMPETITIVE. CONT'D ; 
VEGETABI^ PRODUCT S: 

Coffee imported into P.R 

Cotton, unmfd ; (478 It. "bale) 

Raw, except linters..... 

Linters. 

Feeds and fodders : 

Beet pulp, dried (2,240 l"b.) 
Bran, shorts, etc.( 2 ,000 l"b.)- 
Of direct importation.... 
Withdravm "bonded mills... 
Total bran, shorts, etc 
Hay (2,000 pound) 



1-cake meal- 



Oil cake and o 
Bean ( Soy) 
Coconut. . . 
Cottonseed 
Linseed. . . 
All other. 

Total oil cake and meal 
Fruits : 

Berries, natural state 
C'ar rants 
Dates. . . 



Figs 

Grapes. . 
Lemons. . 
Limes. . . 

Pineapples- 
Fresh 

Prepared or preserve 
Product of the P. I.. 

Raisins. . . 

Olives in "brine 

Grains and grain product 



Barley, grain (48 Ih.) 

Barley, malt 

Corn, grain (56 To.) 
Oats, grain (32 l"b.) 
Rice- 

Unc leaned 

Cleaned or milled. 

Patna 

Meal, flour and "broken 
Rye, grain (56 l"b. ) 



July-April 



; Unit 


Quantity 


Value 




1935-36 


1936-37 


1935-36 


1936-37 








1 r\r\r\ 
1 , UUU 


X , UUU 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


: Lh. 


IbU 


U 


1 < 


u 


! Bale 


114. 


D 


7 T 31 


1 ? 5R7 


I ±iaie 


fl / 9 


48 


a / 148 


1,008 


:' Ton 


18 


52 


373 


1, 365 


■ Ton 


173 


296 


2,940 


6,996 


: Ton 


79 


127 




3.066 


; Ton 


252 


423 


4.118 


10,062 


■ Ton 


4 


172 


34 


1,285 


'• J.'h 
1 ij u . 


31,633 


74,706 


341 


974 


; L"b. 


100, 305 


91,276 


763 


891 


■' T.'b . 


5, 709 


50,413 


50 


550 


' Ti"h. 


15, 023 


39,813 


118 


479 


• Lh. 


3.746 


24.075 


34 


270 


; Lb. 


156.416 


280.283 


1,306 


3,164 


: Lb. 


3,771 


6,030 


238 


401 


; Lb. 


6,953 


. .5,947, 


326 


3<oy 


: Lb. 


51,474 


53,, 503 


1,808 


1,971 


; Lb. 


6,109 


6,330 


403 


434 


:Cu.f t. 


286 


269 


365 


345 


• Lb. 


3,570 


1 , 133 


70 


37 


• Lb. 


6,676 


8,013 


179 


225 




c/ 


c/ 


210 


450 


I Lb. 


4,957 


10,117 


237 


471 


: Lb. 


3,136 


10,535 


157 


456 


: Lb. 


842 


586 


83 


47 


1 Gal a 


5, 113 


D , Dob 


<d , rb'* 




: Bu. 


579 


14,000 


392 


12,463 


: Lb. 


218,833 


354,731 


5,492 


9 , 484 


; Bu. 


30,312 


55,541 


12,734 


29,237 


i Bu. 


: 74 


: 145 


32 


61 


j Lb. 


: 3 , 300 


10,835 


103 


320 


; Lb. 


1 9,356 


: 15,874 


249 


453 


: Lb. 


i 2,783 


: 3,315 


103 


98 


: Lb. 


: 23,342 


j 111,865 


378 


1,939 


Bu. 


2,111 


3,942 


993 


2,599 



Continued - 



330 



Foreign Cpops and Markets 



Vol. 34, No. 24 



UlNTITED STATES;' Imports, .( for consurap,tion) of principal agricultural 
products,: .July-AT>ril',. 1935-36 and 1936-37, cont'd 

■ " ' - — ■ ■ — f f . ■■ -~ ~ - — — - - ■ ■ - ■ ■■ — . -■■ 



■ "' — -■ , * - 't . . 






Ju] 


y-April 






OoTTlTn r» 1^ "1 '\"\T T TTlTir^ T* "f* -' ■• 


TTni+-- 


Quantity 




Valu 




-. . __ !. 




1935-o6 


1936r37 


1935- 


•36 




COMPETITI^'/B, COIIT'D: ,: 










1,000 


1,000 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, CONT'D: : 






'Thousands 


. dollars 


dollars 


Grains and grain prod., cont'd: : 
















TTheat, grain- (60 Ibc) ; 
















Dutia"ble at 42^/^ per "ba. 


Buo 


22!.;022 


CO ) 




XO J 


OOO 


28,826 


Dutiable at 10^ ad vale d/ • 


Buo 


7,816 


'7 

o , 




0 , 




3,261 


Milled in bond for export- \ 


















Bu. 
Bu. 


3,464 
6,207 


7, 


901 


•7 

o , 

-5, 


UO J- 

099 


3,502 
7,478 




Bui. 


39,509 


■ 43, 


481 


32, 


045 


43,067 




Bbl. 


14 




■ 40 




60 


192 


"(Theat, including flour I 


Bu. 


39,576 


43, 


667 


32, 


105 


43,259 






■c/ 




ll 


l^i, 


193 


15,427 ■ 


Oils, vescetal^le: ; 


















Lb. 


301,181 


263, 


801 


11, 


209 


.12,658 ■ 




Lb. 


23,338 


27, 


715 


1, 


4,67. 


2,030 




Lb. 


118,638 


127, 


813 


6 , 


921 


. 7,343 - 




Lto. 


897 




261 




37. 


14 




Lb . 


55,546 


A O 

4o , 


920 


s 


ODD 


7,134 




Lb. 


33,087 


33, 


784! 


2, 


372 


2 , 842 ' 




Lb. 


33,793 


49, 


876 


1, 


365 


2,794 




Lb. 


285. 333 


284, 


956 


9, 


735 


. 9,633 




Lb). 


53,392 


22, 


296 


2 


660. 


■ 1^337 




Lb. 


78,685 


42, 


337. 




•618 


. -2^647 ^■ 


Rapeseed oil • 


Gal • 


9,243 


3, 


248 


3, 


673 


1,531 




Lb. 


7,151 


7, 


903 




335 


418 




Lb. 


19,952 


11, 


784 


1, 


342 


747 




Lb. 


119,656 


115, 


773 


15, 


299 


14,485 


Oilseeds: ; 
































Lb . 


130,491 


123, 


622 


2. 


851 


2,899 - 




Lb. 


417,166 


318, 


343 


8, 


820 


8,751 




Bu. 


13,398 


19, 


772 


.12, 


645 


■ ■24,-607 


Palm nuts and kernels..-. ; 


Lb . 


11,114 


44, 


.152 




213 


1,036 




Lb. 


115,063 


18, 


099 


2, 


947 


626 - 






c/ 




l/. 


4, 


234 


7,829 


Sugar and molasses: ; 


















Ton 


2,571 


2, 


332 


124, 


149 


128,511 




Gal. 


162,805 


249, 


623 


8, 


777 


13,630 


TolDacco, unmanuf a.ctured: I 


















Lb. 


51,194 


52, 


33-8 


23, 


196 


25,957 


Product of the p. I ; 


Lh. 


1,955 


2, 


118 




177 


197 




Lb. 


1,759 


2, 


114 




62 


■ • 66 


Vegetables: I 
















Beans- : 


















Lb. 


12,893 


46, 


931 : 




344 


1,466 




Lb. 


6,599 


4, 


748 




136 


131 



Continued - 



June 14, 1937 



foreign Crcps and Markets' 



331 



IBTITIID STATES: Imports (for consT-uuption) of principal agricultural 
products, July-April, 1935-36 and 1936-37, cont'd 



Commodity imported 



C OJ/iPETlTIVE. C OITT ' D ; 
VEilSTjffi IS PRODUCTS, '55!^ D ; 

Vegetables, cont'd ; 

Chickpeas or garbanzos, dried 

G-arlic • 

Onions 

Peas, except coT-rp's & chickp 

Dried. . 

Green 

Potatoes, white............. 

Tapioca, crude, flour, and prep 

Tomatoes, fresh 

Turnips* . 



Vegetables, canned 



Fibers, vggeta blp ; (2,240 Ib.t 

Elax, "uuimanufactured 

Hemp, -unmanufactured .« 

Jute and jute butts, unrafd. 

Total principal competitive 

agricultural products 

M-COIvlFETITIVB 

Al^IIvLAJL PRODUCTS: 

Silk, raw 



s- 



n) 



??"ool, unmfd., free in bond... 
VEGETABLE PRODUCTS: 

Bananas 

Coffee, ex. into Puerto Eico. 

Cacao or cacao beans i 

Tea 

Drugs, herbs, roots, etc 

Spices 

Fibers, veget^jbler C2,?,40 lb . to 

Kapok 

Manila 

Sisal and henequen * 

Bubber, crude, inol. guryule. 
Total principal arricuitural- 

ITon-cornpetitive products 

Competitive products 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL AGRI. PROD 
TOTAL AGRICULTL:R.4i PRODUCTS .. 
TOTAL IIvIPORTS, ALL CO^S/IODITISS 



July-Ar>ril 



Jnit 


Qirantity 


Tal^. 






1935-3 3 


1936-37 


1935-36 : 


1955-37 








1 , 000 ■; 


1,000 




Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars ■ 


dollars 


Lb. 


8,505 


10,002 


289 • 


397 


Lb. 






.... 270 


197 


T >, 
J_'0 . 


2,947 


3,676. 


0<o 


■ 79 


Lb. 




T TXT 


11:9 


41 


Lb. 


3,063 


6,329 


1 4-R 




Lb • 


34 •'^'17 


75 , 571 


477 


1,454 - 


T>i 
JJU . 


194, ■553 


313 , 219 


A 111 

1 J X -L -1- 


5 824 


Lb . 


78', 214 


82,442 


1,854 


1^943 




115, 283 


•129,999 


653 


912 


Lb * 


55 , 515 


. -56,331 , 


2, 4i2 


2,303 


Ton 


5 


• . . , 5 


2, 648 


2,157 


Ton 
Ton 


1 
72 


1 
73 


235' 
5,757 


261 
5.990 . 


r . - - — 1 




474.232 


515.252 


J_)D . 


53,920 


' ; '56 ,755 ■ 


37 ,361 


97,273 


Lb. 


128,890 


' ,157,013 


19,240 


:• 34,550 


Bvinch 


43 , 002 


49, 835 


21,690 


: 24,179 


Lb. 


1,613,000 


a, 502,478 


117, 533 


; 124,776 


.Lb. 


533,170 


. 595,970 


23, 996 


\ 43,039 






78, 205 


14,611 


: 16,489 




c / 


cj 




; 6 , 140 


Lb. 


85 485 


132, 937 


8 , 599 


: 11^571 


Ton 


: 10 


14 


2,121 


: 3,532 


Ton 
Ton 
Lb. . 


40 
131 
345.215_. 


27 
100 
975.416 


4,4-^5 
' 10,539 
10] .203 


; 4,109 
: 11,323 
: 159.544 






; 418.. 519 
• 47-:.; 352 


• 536,535 
: 515,262- 








89o, 551 


.3-, 151, 797 








. 950,929 


il72^T7l51 






i ,824, 593 


;2, 337, 223 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Four months (January-April, 1935) b/ Includes cheddar cheese prior to 
January 1, 1936. c/ Reported in value only, d/ Unfit for h-aman consumption. 



332 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 3^, No. 2k 



UMITED STATES: Export quantity of specified agricultural products, 
January-April, 1936 and 1937, and April, 1936 and 1937 



Commodity 


Unit 


January- April 


April 


1936 


1937 


1936 


: 1937 


EXPORTS, DOMESTIC: 




Thousands 


Thousands 


Thousands 


Thousands 




L"b. 


256 


191 


856 


931 




lib. 


3 , 14U 




i± , oil 


11 , 




L"b. . 


9,489 


8^245 


38,581. , 


' 28,828 


Gra^ins and preparations J 
















320 


504 


2,072 


1,191 




Bu. 


10 


4 


. 91 


55 


Rice~ 














LlD. 


388 


3,106 


8,157 


28,518 


Elcur, meal, etc. « 


LI). 


6 


7 


: 8 


120 
















Bu. 


16 


137 


86 


270 
















Bill 


62 


126 ''■ 


- 257 


462 


Fruits: 












Eresh- 














Bu. 


750 


316 • 


4,286 


2,415 . 




LTd. 


948 


498 


13,702 


• 11,226 




Box 


678 


317 


1, 608 


1,027 




Box 


141 


74 ■ 


• 394 


■326 
















T,"h- 


1,014 


334 


• . • 7,308 


7,159 






640 


987 


- ■ ■ 3,396 


6,236 




LlD. 


9,611 


■ 11,872 


62,277 


59 , 321 




L^b. 


3,953 


6,199 


21,551 


39,024 




LlD. 


2,400 


5,962 


19,793 


28,002 


TolDacco leaf: 














LI). 


13,304 


11 , 197 


■84,857 


56,314 


Dark-fired Kentucky 














LI). 


7,446 ' 


8,731 


27,030 


21,137 




LI). 


3,034 ■ 


3,145 


16,621 


15,139 




Ld. 


23,784 


23,073 


128,508 


102,590 


Cotton, excl. linters 














Bale 


353 


373 


1,706 


1,866 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Includes Coraherland and Wiltshire sides, 
h/ Includes paddy in terms of cleaned. 

c/ Includes haskets, iDOxes, and barrels in terms of bushels. 



June 14, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



3321 



UMITED STATES: Imports (for conss-umption) of specified agricultui^al producta, 
Jamary-April, 1956 aiid 1957, and April, 1936 and. 1957 



Commodity 



Unit 



January- April 



April 



1936 



1937 



1936 



1937 



Cattle, live ; 

Dutia"ble ("by weight) - 

Less than 175 pounds each... 
175 pounds and less than 

700 pounds each ' 

700 pounds or more, each-' 
Cov/s f or dairy purposes;.. 

Other cattle i 

Total cattle (dutialsle) 

Breeding ( free) . 

Beef, canned, including corned... 

Butter 

Cheese ; 
Swiss- 

Emmenthaler (eye formation) 
Gruyere » . . 

Blue mold (original loaves)... 

Cheddar (original loaves) 

Edam and Gouda 

Provoloni and Provolette 

Ileggiano or Parmesan 

Romano or Pecorino 

Roquefort 

Other cheese 

Total cheese. 

Egg products, excl. eggs 

in the shell 

Tallow. 

Wool d/. 

Grains : 

Corn 

Oats 

Rye 

Wheat e/ 

Barley malt 

Oilseeds ; 

Copra 

Flaxseed 

Oils, vegetahle ; 

Coconut 

Palm 

Perilla 

Tung 

Sugar, raw (2,000 pounds) 

Molasses. . , * , . , 





Thousands 


[ Thousands 


Thousands 


• Thousands 


No. 


11 


: 28 


7 


10 


No. 


66 


69 


. -34 


: 50 


No. 
No. 


1 

81 


: 2 

: 79 


: ■ a/ 

37 


• 1 

: 15 


No. 


179 


: 198 


78 


: 56 


No. 


2 


: 4 


• 1 


: 1 - 


Ih. 


.34,736 


: 22,253 


"11,897 


: 10,446 


Lh. ■ 


4,288 


1 8,970 


: ■ — 661 


i 1,130 


Lh. • 


1,700 


3,298 


; . ■ 332 


: 934 


Lh. 


b/ 459 


929 


'. ■•• 196 


: 255 


Lb. . 


~ c/ 


1,487 


' • -c/ 


: 375 


Lh. . 


3,217 


2,197 ■ 


374 


: 355 


Lh. 


Vf 694 


■ 1,773 


' 205 


: 426 


Lh. 


1, 508 


1,888 


493 


: 482 


Lh. 


1,036 


558 


378 


: 104 


Lh. 


4,046 


: 5,642 


• 1,567 


: 1,420 


Lh. 


729 


: 923 


112 


550 


Lh. 
Lh. 


3, 554 


2,736 


. 760 


: 684 ■. 


16; 943 


2i;43i 


4,217 


5,565 


Lh. ^ 


2,235 


3,903 


560 ' 


1,047 


Lh, 


27,802 


5,778 


, 3,775. 


3,050 


Liu . 


ox , XOVJ 


QQ Q P,A 




?n 4?i 


Bu. 


4, 690 


29,732 


1,052 


6,211 


jdu. 


S3? 


^ J. 


±X 


o 


Bu. 


20 


207 


0 


0 


Bu. 


8,838 


6,031 


1,556 


1,091 


Lh. : 


70,539 


175,058 


21 , 642 


47,157 


Lh. ; 


139 , 510 


141,453 


53,941 


9,558 






1 1 230 • 


1,057 


2,280 


Lh. : 


124,353 


114,598 i 


40,540 : 


56,115 


Lh. : 


124,441 


111,995 : 


51,511 : 


50,440 


Lb. i 


46,090 


5,604 : 


15,594 i 


5,393 


Lb. : 

Ton : 
Gal. •' 


53,080 

1,304 . 
63,249 


64(261 : 

1,357 ; 

106,623 : 


10,957 : 

. . 364 : 
54.798 ■ 


19 , 508 
462 
41,717 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Less than 500. b/ Three months. Not separately classified prior to Feb. 1, 
1936. c/ Uot separately classified prior to June 15, 1936. d/ Excludes wool 
imported free in bond for use in carpets, 6tc. e/ Includes only wheat full 
duty paid and 10 percent ad valorem. 



334- 



Porei^ Crops and Mai*kets 



Vol. 34, No. 24 



HOGS: 



Latest European 1935 rnd 1937 enumerations, compared vrith. 
' figures for a year earlier 

Date of 



Country: 



Total hogs 
Ge rraany . ....... 

Deninark. ........ 

Netherlands. . . . 

Czechoslovakia. 
Austria a/. . . . . 

Smtzerland. . . . 

Poland. ........ 

Norvray. ...... . . 

Sweden. 

Latvia. 

Estonia 

England and Fale 
Scotland. ....... 

Northern Ireland 
Irish Eree State 

Sows h/ 
Germejtiy (hred) . 
Denmark (hred), 
Czechoslovakia. 

Austria a/ 

Netherlands. . . . 
Switzerland. . . . 
England and Wale 

Scotland. 

Northern Ireland 



)er 01 



Enumeration 


head 


Enumeration 


Head 


Mar. 


3, 1936 


21 


,220,944 


Mar. 


3, 1937 


22, 


628, 


053 


Mar. 


21, 1936 


3,354,000 


Mar. 


27, 1937 


3, 


059, 


000 


Nov. 


1935 


X 


ACQ Hi^n 


Nov. 


1936 


1, 


742, 


500 


Jan. 


1, 1936 


2 


,744,745 


J an . 


1, 1937 


3, 


242, 


158 


Dec 


1, 1935 




70,571 


Dec . 


1, 1936 




70, 


768 


Nov. 1935 (end) 


1 


,110,980 


Nov. 1936 (end) 


1, 


025, 


780 


June 


30, 1935 


6 


,723,000 


June 


30, 1936 


7, 


055, 


0(0 


June 


20, 1935 




410,000- 


June 


20, 1936 




410 


000 


Oct. 


1, 1935 


1 


,352,178 


Oct . 


7, 1935 


, 1, 


443, 


996 


June 


25, 1955 




803,101 


June 


26, 1936 . 




674 


374 


June 


15, 1935 




289,190 


June 


15, 1936 




244, 


560 


Dec. 


1935 


4 


,113,000^ 


Dec. 


1935 


4, 


055, 


000 


Dec. 


'1935 




272,000 


Dec. 


1933 




257 


000 


Dec. 


1935 




488,000 


Dec. 


1936 




550 


000 


Jujtae 


1935 


1 


,088,000 


June 


1936 


1,010, 


000 


Mar. 


3, 1936 


1 


,211,332' 


Mar. 


3, 1937 


1, 


152, 


619 


Mar. 


21, 1936 




289,000 


Mar. 


2?, 1937 




230, 


000 


Jan. 


1, 1936 




4-25,062 


Jan. 


1, 1937 




515, 


544 


Dec. 


1, 1935 




' 5,113 


Dec, 


1, 1935 




5, 


304 


Nov . 


1935 




145, 965 


Nov. 


1936 




135, 


523 


Nov. 


1935 




90,079 


Nov . 


1935 




79, 


000 


Dec. 


1935 




507,000 


Dec. 


1936 




480, 


000 


Dec. 


1935 




31,000 


Dec . 


1935 




29, 


000 


Dec . 


1935 




52,000 


Dec. 


1935 




.5.7, 


.000 



Numher of 



Compiled hy H. E. Reed, Livestock Specialist, Berlin, 
a/ Numher of hogs on ahout 4,000 farms, 
h/ Total sows ujiless otherwise stated. 



BULGARIA: Production of specif ied. grains, - 1932-1937 





: Winter 


Winter 


■ffinter 


Year 


: wheat 


r;y-e 


"barley 




: 1,000 


1 , 000 


1,000 




; "bushels 


hushels 


"bushels 






8,673 


11,229 ■;. 






■ 9,293 


■ 13,536 ■ 






6, 074' 


7,Q81 - 






6,576 


10,842 ■ : 






8,658 


12,300 " ' 






9,133 


14,008 "- 



International Institute of JigricuJ-ture , Rome. 



June 14, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



335 



HOG-S: European slaughter or rnarketings, calendar years 1935 and 1936 
a.nd various periods, of 1936 and 1937 



Country 



Calendar years 



1935 



'• l^vstth e r 

Germany a/ :18,197,407 



Austria b/ 



701,251 



Belgium c/ \ 312,319 

CzechoslovaJcia d/....... | 4,004,455 

Poland f/ ; 1,180,046 

Lithuania .' 330,341 

Sweden h/ ; ' 936,694 

Norway i/ : 328,334 

England and mies j./ ! 1,423,000 

Scotland k/ ] 209,300 

All Ireland l/ ■ 1,775,479 



L936 



Euniber 
19,149,766 

620 , 310 

320,, 521 
3,713,599 
1,241,124 

475,611 
• 977,421 

307,699 
1,532,000 

233 , 200 
1,907,063 



Period bofelnning Janus.rj'' 1 



Length 



( 2 months) 
(3 months) 
( 2 months) 
( 3 months) 
( 2 months) 
( 3 months) 
(3 months) 
( 2 m;onths) 
(16 weeks) 
( 16 weeks) 
(16 weeks) 



1936 



e/ 



!NTim"ber 
5,117,507 
158,051 
44,985 
51,965 
206,973 
135,055 
227,863 
43 , 272 
488,759 
65,854 
520,435 



1937 



Number 
3,828,588 
150,452 
54,998 
51,095 
217,020 
124,839 
263,297 
46,755 
512,952 
55,250 
534,825 



Compiled by H. E. Reed, Livestock Specialist, Berlin, a/ Inspected slaughter, 
b/ Total market supplies Vienna includirig balance from previous month, c/ Hogs 
slaughtered in Principal Belgian Slaughter Houses, d/ Taxed slaughter, e/ Mar- 
ketings at Prag^ae. f / Slaughter at 32 principal markets, g./ Based on weekly 
reports from export slaughter houses, h/ Represents approximately 50 percent 
of total slaughter. if Represents approximately 90 percent of total slaughter, 
j./ Marketings of fat and store pigs at certain markets in England and TTales. 
k/ Marketings of fat and store pigs at representative Scottish markets. ,l/ Pigs 
bought dead and alive for curing plus exports of live pigs. 



^HEAT, INCLiroiNG ELOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
as given by current trade sources, 1934-35 to 1936-37 



Country 



North America a/. . . 
Canada, 4 markets b 
United States c/. .7 

Argentina 

Australia 

U.S.S.R 

Danube and Bulgaria 

British India 

Total e/ 

Total European 

shipments a/ 

Total ex-European 
shipments a/ 



d/. 



Total 
shi-pments 



Shipments 1937 
week ended 



: 1934-35 


1935-36 


May 22 


May 29 


June 5 


1935-36 


1935-37 


: 1,000 

: bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
3 bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushe Is 


' 1,000 
bushels 


: 1, 000 
bushels 


■162,832 
•176,059 
: 31,532 


219,688 
246,199 
15,930 


4,854 

2,804 

234 


: 2,728 
: 2,851 
: 225 


2, 835 

2,915 

260 


198 , 312 
231,884 
5,735 


210-5-153 

185,579 
8,337 


•186,228 
: 111, 628 
: 1,672 
: 4,104 

:c/2.318 


77,384 
110 , 060 

30 , 224 
8,216 
c/2,529 


2,004 
3,220 
0 

1,616 

49 6 


: 1,003 

' 4,510 

: 0 

2,400 
43 


2,711 
3,794 

0 

920 
48 


74,956 
106,340 
29 , 024 
8,168 
256 


160,028 
97,396 

88 

62,912 
9,528 


;458,782 


448 , 101 








417,056 


540 , 105 


1387,752 


355,032 


11 , 104 






422.048 


i/ 

434,000 


•147,938 


133 . 528 


1,832 • 






f/ 

116,352 


f/ 

114,952 



Shipments 
July 1 - June 5 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ Broorfihall' s Corn Trade News, 
b/ Port William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and New Westminster, 
c/ Official, d/ Black Sea shipments only, e/ Total of trade figures includes 
North j^erica as reported by Broomhall. f/ To May 22. 



336 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 34, No. 24 



ITIIEIAT: Closing Saturday prices of July futures 

























Due no s 


Date 


; Chicago 


jKansa 


3 City 


Minneapolis 


Winnipeg a/ 


; Liverpool a/ 


Aires 






: 1935 


1937 


; 1936 


_J-127, 


,1936 


1937 


•1936 


1937 


' 1935 


.1937 ^ 


1935 


,1937 


High c/. . . 


:Cents 


Cents 


; Cents 


Cents 


" Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


: Cents 


; Gents 


Cent s 


; Cents 


: 94 


130 


; 93 


125 


104 


142 


84 


145 


: 94 


i 154 


d/ 91 


i 126 


Low cj. . . . 


: 84 


107 


: 79 


105 


90 


119 


74 


115 


: 84 


i 131 


d/ 90 


i 113 


May 15. . . . 


! 86 


118 


: 81 


115 


91 


127 


78 


130 


: 89 


: 138 


90 


: 120 


22 


; 85 


122 


: 81 


119 


92 


132 


75 


133 


: ■ 85 


: 143 


e/ 90 


j 120 


29 


: 84 


113 


; 80 


110 


94 


125 


75 


123 


: 86 


: 140 


e/ 90 


: 122 


June 5 . . . . 


; 84 


107 


: 79 


105 


93 


119 


77 


115 


86 


: 132 


e/ 91 


: 120 


a/ Conversions at noon "buyin, 


5 rate 


of exc 


;harg e 


h/ Prices 


are of day previous to 


other prices, c/ Apr. 


1 to date. 


d/ July and Aug^ast futures, e/ August futures. 




UHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at 


stated markets 






All c3.asses 


- No. 


2 


Wo. 


1 


Ko. 2 Hard 


Ko. 2 


Western 


Week i 


and grades 


jHard Winter 


Dk.K. Spring 


Amter Durrim 


Red Winter 


White 


ended ; 


six markets 


Kansas City 


Minneapoli s 


Minneapolis 


St. Louis 


Seattle a/ 




1936 


1937 


.1936 


1937 


1935 


1937 


1935 


1937 


1935 


1937 


1936 


1937 




Cents 


Cents 


, Gent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents. 


Cents 


Gents: 


Cents 


High Td/. . . j 


98 


146 


, 106 


144 


127 


170 


no 


199 


no: 


147 


87: 


122 


Low Id/ .... '■ 


87 


124 


: 91 


127 


108 


139 


103 


117 


100 : 


125 


78: 


112 


May 15 i 


87 


130 


. 93 


130 


108 


146 


106 


128 


100: 


131 


80i 


112 


22. ... : 


90 


132 


94 


132 


112 


147 


108 


130 


101: 




81: 


118 


29 : 


90 


131 


91 


130 


114 


146 


107 


123 


100; 


132 


78i 


115 


June 5 .... ; 


91 


124 


91 


127 


120 


139 


104 


117 


lOOi 


125 


78i 





a/ Weekly average of daily cash quotations, hasis Eo. 1 sacked, h/ Apr. 1 to date. 



MOROCCO: Area and production of specified grains, 1932-1937 



Harvest 
year 


Wheat 


Barley 


Oats 


Are?. 


Producti on 


Area 


;f reduction 


Area 


Producti on 




1,000 


1,000 


1 , 000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




acres 


"bushels 


a.crcs 


Idv she Is 


acres 


Diishels 


1932 


2, 7 13 


27,970 


3". 2^; 3 


47,145 


56 


1,;;5"7 


1933 


3,209 


28,902 


3; 752 


50,406 


79 


1,883 


1934 


3,018 


39,586 


3^&i4 


69,033 


66 


1,894 


1935 


3,616 


20,036 


4,305 


35. d08 


70 


1,062 


1936 


3, 194 


13 , 242 


4,104 


70,108 


80 


1,328 


1937 


2,743 


17, 637 


4,201 


34,447 


94 


2,755 



International Institute of Agriculture , Rome. 



Jiine 14, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



337 



FEED GRAIITS AND RYE: T7eekl7 avera.^^e price pe'r Isu'shel o'f corh, rye, 
oats, and barley at leading markets a/ 









Corn 






Hye 


Oats 


Barley 






Chi 


cago 




Buenos-'iiires 


Minneapolis 


Chicago 


Minneapolis 




• ■ I-To . ■ 3 
Yellow 


Futures 


Fu.tures 


ITO:. 


o 


No. 3- 

TTnite 


¥.0 . 


o 

/J 




1936 


■ 1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


■ ■ 1937 


, 1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 




Cents 


Cents 


C^nts 


Cents 


Cents 


: Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


High • . . 


■ ' 65 


138 


62 


123 


43 


: : 57 


58 


1-17 


31 


55 


74 


137 


Low 'bj 


59. . 


, .108 . 


, 59 
July 


101 
July 


42 
July 


: : 54 
: July 


48 


105 


25 


49 


58 


80 


;May 8 


64 


138 


61 


119 


43 


:' 55 


49 


110 


28 


53 


61 


122 


15 • • • • • 


63 


130 


61 


117 


42 


: ■ 55 


52 


105- 


27 


51 


67 


117 


22 • • • • • 
2^ •••••• 

June 5 


63 
62 

■ 61 


137. . 

135 

128 


60 
60 
60 


120 
123 
122 


42 
c/42 
c/43 


: ■ 55 
: ■ 57 

: . . 55 


53 

. 52 
53 


110 
111 
105. 


26 
25 
26 


52 
52 
50 


59 
65 
53 


109 
96 
80 



a/ Cash prices are weighted a.veragos of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations, 'hj For "period January 1, to latest date shorm. 
c/ August delivery. ■ 



FEED GRAIITS: Movement from principal exporting countries. 



Co.mraodity 

and 
country 


Expo rt s 
for year 


Shipments 1937, 
week ended aj . . 


Exports a-s far 
as reported 


,1934-35 


1935-36 


May 22 ^vlay 29 


June 5 


July 1 
, .to , . 


1935-36 


1936-3? 

\/ 


BAIlLFi, EXPORTS: c/ 
I'United -States.... 

Canada 

Argentina. 

Danube & U.S.'S.R.' 

Total 

OATS, EI-CPORTS: c/ 

United States . . . . 

Argentina 

Danube & U.S.S.R. 


■1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 : . 1,000 
bushels; bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


.June 5 
Apr. 30 
J'une 5 
June 5 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


■ ■ '4, 050 
14,453 
20,739 
11,250 


9,886 
6,882 
9,468 
37,375 


c! : : 0 

60 '. ' 23 
445 ' ' 305 


. .120 

, . .220 
272 


9,124 
4,6.77 
9,078 
40,942 


5,243 
16,541 
14,205 
25, 630 


50,492 


63,611 








63,821 


61 , 619 


1,147 

17,407 

43,753 
8^-4-14 


1,429 
14,892 
9,790 
2,847 


4 0 

117 69 
C; 10 


: 0 

: 855 
: 0 


June 5 

Apr. 30 

Jvjio 5 
June 5 


926 
12,355 
10,441 
1,390 


748 
8,822 
22,642 

820 


70,751 


28 , 958 








25,112 


33,032 


CORN, EICPORTS: d/ 
Uni tod- States. . . . 
Danube & U.S.S.R. 

Argentina 

South Africa 

Total 

United States 
imports 


,380 
14,939 
256,143 
21,882 


885 
14,984 
307,638 
8,910 


Q 3 
1,199; 578 
8,047 5,992 
7?; 39 


; 0 
: 102 

: 13,913 

: 25^ 


Nov.l tc 

Juno 5 
June 5 
June 5 
Jxme 5 


438 
7,569 
151,254 
6 , 557 


211 
19,727 
240,356 
3,014 


293,8'j4 


332,-1-17 








175,918 


263,308 


': 41,141 


24,521 






Apr. 30 


8, ■■33 


• 40.425 



Compiled from official and trade sources. aJ The -yeeks sho^n in these colmms axe 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary, cj Year beginning July 1. cj Year 
beginning November 1. 



338 



Foreig}! Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, IvTo. 24 



Index 
Pa^e 

Late cables r ^ ^, - 

317 : : Oats, cont ' dt 

i^^r-i n^■^^^-^J i~ " " I Pi" 0 duc t i On , Liorocco, 

,IT I U.S.:' J J 1932-1937 317 ... 

Index n-ambers, A:oril 1937 323 Pirea^les- 317,336 

''iS'm"'"'' . 1^2^ 319 

Agricultural .'^o^li:' :.;:lnoi^'''''' M ''1935' 37"'"'''°'' 

^^o^moaities. u.S. April 1937 328,333 Export pros;;;;;,' '0;;;,° "ig^^; ! 3^9 

Area,' iiorocco. 1932-1937 317 33. i' p^ff '^^^ 

Production. -Ly-^''. • • • 317,336 :: Potatoes, area, Czechoslovakia, 

Bulgaria' (winter), i! j.^T^'^^'^^ 317 

1932-1937 317 3.. '^i;^. ^ 

Morocco, 1932-1937 317'^.^ ^^'f';.^' ^' ''"^^ ^' ^^"^^ 337 

Citrus oil.: ^^^'^"^ production (-.vinter). Bulgaria, 

Exoorts ("orange) ^-ench Pi.inp. ' ^^^2-1937 317,334 

Production, Sicily 1936-37 7i o . ^ -u ^ '^'^^^ 

Pr.U crop,.os:oec?s,\^o.^I:-- J! ^"f SeJslv: . r!"^' '^^^ ^^^^^ 

. 318 : : ?7heat: 

Grams: 

Growing conditions -anada '' '' f"' 1932-1937.... 317,3^6 

Ma^Sl, 1937.. ' 3no P^^ces, specified :.arkets. 

Move.ent;(feed;;';;;;;:;;i ii ^.^^tL"^^ 

countries, June 5 1^37 -r, . ' ^ 

Pricpc rfp«^^ • . ; Bulgaria winter , 

Prices (feed), principal markets, :: 1932-1937 -z.. 

June 5. 1937 .^7 „ • ol7,334 

Livestock ho.^s). 1932-1937 317,336 

^-^ers, _ specified ^opean ] I ^^S^J' iSf^^^^' 335 

co-untries, 1936,1937 321,33^ Wool- • 

Slaugnter, specified ^ai-op.an :.. M^^ket conditions ^n^land ' 

Oats 1935-1337 335 :: May 1937 /^ .^f. 322 

\r;a, Morocco, 1932-1937 317 336 ^"t""' (Sy^^ey), ' 

, x:=o^Ljor ^L/,66b :: j-jne 7 - IQ, 1937 317,321